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Impacts of Carbon Dioxide Emissions on Global Intense Hydrometeorological Disasters

  • Volume 4, Issue 1, January 2020

This paper connects climate change and hydrometeorological calamities based on econometric evidence that links atmospheric CO2 accumulations to floods and storms. The study uses climate data from 155 countries, with a period spanning 46 years (1970–2016) and adopted a statistical and econometric approach to assess the factors that have contributed to the increase in the frequency of intense flood and storm events. Findings showed that the number of climate disasters could double in less than 21 years, and thus severely damage the environment, socioeconomic progress, and welfare of millions of people worldwide.


Modeling of degraded reefs in Leyte Gulf, Philippines in the face of climate change and human-induced disturbances

  • Volume 3, Issue 1, August 2017

Philippine reefs are mega-diverse but, to date, few ecosystem models have been developed to understand their dynamics and functioning. This study assessed the status of reefs in 12 municipalities of Leyte Gulf, Philippines. 


The Role of Traditional Ecological Knowledge in the Disaster Risk Management Strategies of Island Communities in Cat Hai, Vietnam

  • Volume 2, Issue 2, July 2017

The very real threat of climate change requires effective disaster risk management (DRM), especially in highly vulnerable ecosystems such as island communities. Past disaster experiences in different parts of the world have revealed the importance of integrating traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) with scientific fndings in managing disaster risk.


Perceptions of Typhoon Haiyan affected communities about the resilience and storm protection function of mangrove ecosystems in Leyte and Eastern Samar, Philippines

  • Volume 1, Issue 1, December 2015

The destruction caused by Typhoon Haiyan in the coastal areas of central Philippines drew greater international attention to the vulnerability of coastal communities to extreme weather and climate events. Mangrove ecosystems enhance coastal resilience by acting as barriers against storms and its impacts.


Vegetation resistance and regeneration potential of Rhizophora, Sonneratia and Avicennia in the Typhoon Haiyan-affected mangroves in the Philippines: Implications on rehabilitation practices

  • Volume 1, Issue 1, October 2015

Typhoons cause damage to mangrove ecosystems, hampering their delivery of ecosystem goods and services, including coastal protection. We examined the vegetation resistance (VR) and seedling regeneration potential (SRP) of three mangrove genera: Rhizophora, Sonneratia and Avicennia at the seafront areas..


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