ISSN 2467-6926

A project of

Volume 4, Issue 1, May 2019

Harvesting and Managing Rainwater Using Collapsible Rubber Tanks

  • Received: 22 June 2016 / Accepted: 01 April 2019/ Published online: 17 May 2019
  • https://doi.org/10.18783/cddj.v004.i01.a01

Highlights

  • The types of collapsible rubber tank (CRT) that were found useful, easier to fabricate and manage are the pillow/bladder, vertical square, and vertical rectangular types.
  • The cost of a tank with 500-800 liter capacity ranges from PhP 3,500-5,000 (USD 65-95). Average water use reduction of 2-8 m3 for a five-member household can save PhP 37-146 (USD 0.68-2.73) monthly.
  • The reduced surface runoff and pressure on groundwater use are major positive environmental impacts gained from using CRT.
  • The CRT is a versatile option for storing water in hard-to-reach areas affected by typhoon where water supply is limited.


Abstract

Rainwater harvesting (RWH) is an existing technology proven to be effective in reducing pressure on water resource, yet often overlooked by planners, engineers, builders and decision-makers as a viable alternative for supplying water to households and businesses while reducing stormwater runoff in urban settings. RWH tanks are commonly made of concrete, plastic, stainless steel, ferrocement or earthen jars. In this study, the use of collapsible rubber tanks (CRTs) as an alternative storage container for RWH was explored. The study was conducted in Barangay La Mesa, Calamba City, Philippines. This barangay uses rainwater for domestic use. Bladder or pillow, rectangular and square-type designs were installed, tested and monitored in terms of ease of use and handling. The portability of the tank makes it an attractive option in an urban setting where space is limited and land is expensive. A CRT with 500-800 liter capacity can be used by a five-member household for three days for their basic water needs, and comes at an affordable price range of PhP 3,500-5,000 (USD 65-95). With proper handling and maintenance, the CRT can be a good alternative for rainwater storage and serve other purposes. It can be useful in hard-to-reach areas particularly during emergency situations and relief operations. 


Keywords

rainwater harvesting, collapsible rubber tank, climate change adaptation, El Niño


Corresponding Author

Marisa Sobremisana
School of Environmental Science and Management, University of the Philippines Los Baños
mjsobremisana@yahoo.com

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