ISSN 2467-6926

A project of

Latest Issue

Volume 3, Issue 1, December 2018

This issue features assessment studies on the: 1) status of typhoon-affected reefs in Leyte Gulf, Philippines; 2) resilience of water resources in Tacloban, Philippines affected by Typhoon Haiyan; 3) adaptation gaps in the post-Typhoon Bopha recovery and reconstruction in Eastern Mindanao, Philippines; 4) transportation resilience in Tacloban after Typhoon Haiyan; and 5) adaptive capacities of local communities to flashfloods and landslides in Compostela Valley after Typhoon Bopha.


Download Full Issue

Search Archive

Search by: Search Text:

Journal Articles

Total Carbon Column Observing Network Philippines: Toward Quantifying Atmospheric Carbon in Southeast Asia

  • Volume 2, Issue 2, March 2017

TCCON (Total Carbon Column Observing Network) is dedicated to the precise measurements of greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4. TCCON measurements are used extensively for satellite validation, for atmospheric chemistry modeling, and for carbon cycle studies.


Simulating impacts of El Niño and climate change on corn yield in Isabela, Philippines

  • Volume 2, Issue 1, January 2017

Advancing climate change and increasing frequency of El Niño events will impact corn growth and development in Isabela Province. This study assessed the potential impact of El Niño and climate change on yellow corn (Zea mays L.).


Adaptability of the mental models approach to the development of risk communication messages on climate change for rice farmers in Pangasinan Province, Philippines

  • Volume 2, Issue 1, November 2016

The mental models approach has been put forward as a method for investigating laypeople’s knowledge, beliefs, and perception as precursor to the development of risk communication messages and strategies. Using means-ends analysis, the paper assessed the adaptability of the mental models approach to the development of risk communication messages on climate change for rice farmers in a village in the province of Pangasinan.


Calibration, validation and application of CERES-Maize model for climate change impact assessment in Abuan Watershed, Isabela, Philippines

  • Volume 2, Issue 1, November 2016

Recently, corn farmers in Abuan Watershed and Isabela Province are experiencing declining crop yields caused by insufficient amount of rainfall. To increase crop yields and reduce production risks, research on better use of available rainfall and better understanding on effects of climate variability, and soil and field management on crop production is imperative.


Toward developing a humanitarian crowdsourcing model: Enabling medical and disaster response through digital collaboration

  • Volume 2, Issue 1, November 2016

Lately, the humanitarian community has been utilizing crowdsourcing to facilitate medical and disaster response. Grounded in Geiger et al.’s (2011) Crowdsourcing Information Systems (CIS) and Suroweicki’s (2004) Wisdom of the Crowds (WC), this study contentanalyzed 23 humanitarian crowdsourcing websites to find out how crowdsourcing has enabled medical and disaster response, as evident in global humanitarian movements from 2010 to 2014.


The impacts of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines: Implications to land use planning

  • Volume 1, Issue 1, January 2016

Recent extreme weather events have brought devastating impacts on people’s lives and infrastructure in many parts of the world. The scale of the impact of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines revealed a high degree of vulnerability and exposure of coastal communities to extreme events in a region that is regularly hit by tropical cyclones.


Assessing social vulnerability to climate-related hazards among Haiyan-affected Areas in Leyte, Philippines

  • Volume 1, Issue 1, January 2016

Climate-related hazards can lead to disasters in communities with lower socioeconomic conditions, inadequate access to basic social and infrastructure services, and poor institutions. The impacts of Typhoon Haiyan that struck the Philippines in 2013 not only highlighted the exposure of several cities but also indicated the underlying causes of their social vulnerability to climate-related hazards.


Assessing and mapping barangay-level social vulnerability of Tacloban City and Ormoc City to climate-related hazards

  • Volume 1, Issue 1, December 2015

The destruction left by Typhoon Haiyanin the Philippines highlighted not only the exposure of the country but also the underlying vulnerability of barangays (villages) to climate-related hazards. This study utilized Geographic Information System (GIS) to characterize social vulnerability to climate-related hazards of barangays of Tacloban City and Ormoc City using a modified social vulnerability index (SoVI).


Perceptions of Typhoon Haiyan affected communities about the resilience and storm protection function of mangrove ecosystems in Leyte and Eastern Samar, Philippines

  • Volume 1, Issue 1, December 2015

The destruction caused by Typhoon Haiyan in the coastal areas of central Philippines drew greater international attention to the vulnerability of coastal communities to extreme weather and climate events. Mangrove ecosystems enhance coastal resilience by acting as barriers against storms and its impacts.


Potential long-term impact of Typhoon Haiyan on the water resources of Tacloban City and its vicinity

  • Volume 1, Issue 1, November 2015

Tacloban City is one of the hardest hit cities of the 2013 Super Typhoon Haiyan. Aside from the recorded thousands of death, Haiyan is predicted to have altered the terrestrial ecology of the affected area. In particular, this study investigated the probable impact on water resources as a result of the change in forest cover resulting from Haiyan.


Error message here!

Hide Error message here!

Invalid username and/or password.

Forgot your password?

Register a new account

This email is already registered. You can try logging in this account by clicking login above or try a new email if you typed your email by mistake.

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close