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Philippine Institutions and Complex Institutional arrangements for Climate Change Adaptation in Agriculture

  • Volume 4, Issue 1, January 2021

The Philippines is one of the countries highly vulnerable to climate change, and this condition threatens further the meager agricultural production in the country. However, while the Philippines has established the institutional foundations linking climate change to agriculture, through policies and legislation, advances in climate change adaptation have been slow, especially at the local level. This paper demonstrated that this gap in policy formulation and actual implementation stems from the lack of institutional analysis in CCA efforts in the Philippines. The paper concludes that along with the scientific and technological discussions, institutional conversations should be among the initial vital steps in CCA planning, and policy and decision-making. It further advocates that institutional analysis can be the entry point for designing reforms toward effective CCA implementation.


Adaptive capacity of local communities to flash floods and landslides: Comparison of indigenous and non-indigenous people in Eastern Mindanao

  • Volume 3, Issue 1, December 2018

Only few studies investigated the adaptive capacity or adaptation practices of indigenous peoples (IPs) in the Philippines and none so far in the Compostela Valley. Since the landslide and flash flood events in 2012 brought by Typhoon Bopha, no systematic study has been conducted to compare the adaptive capacity of IPs and non-IPs in New Bataan’s most affected communities. This paper contributes to the assessments of adaptive behavior with the ultimate goal of stimulating adaptation support to the most vulnerable people.


Adaptive Capacity of Indigenous Peoples to Changing Climate: The case of the Aytas of Floridablanca, Pampanga, Philippines

  • Volume 2, Issue 2, July 2017

The livelihoods of Aytas of Floridablanca, Pampanga, Philippines are dependent on natural resources, which are prone to climate change impacts. To assess their adaptive capacity, this paper analyzed the different resources available in their community using the Sustainable Livelihoods Approach Framework. 


The Role of Traditional Ecological Knowledge in the Disaster Risk Management Strategies of Island Communities in Cat Hai, Vietnam

  • Volume 2, Issue 2, July 2017

The very real threat of climate change requires effective disaster risk management (DRM), especially in highly vulnerable ecosystems such as island communities. Past disaster experiences in different parts of the world have revealed the importance of integrating traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) with scientific fndings in managing disaster risk.


Adaptability of the mental models approach to the development of risk communication messages on climate change for rice farmers in Pangasinan Province, Philippines

  • Volume 2, Issue 1, November 2016

The mental models approach has been put forward as a method for investigating laypeople’s knowledge, beliefs, and perception as precursor to the development of risk communication messages and strategies. Using means-ends analysis, the paper assessed the adaptability of the mental models approach to the development of risk communication messages on climate change for rice farmers in a village in the province of Pangasinan.


Toward developing a humanitarian crowdsourcing model: Enabling medical and disaster response through digital collaboration

  • Volume 2, Issue 1, November 2016

Lately, the humanitarian community has been utilizing crowdsourcing to facilitate medical and disaster response. Grounded in Geiger et al.’s (2011) Crowdsourcing Information Systems (CIS) and Suroweicki’s (2004) Wisdom of the Crowds (WC), this study contentanalyzed 23 humanitarian crowdsourcing websites to find out how crowdsourcing has enabled medical and disaster response, as evident in global humanitarian movements from 2010 to 2014.


Assessing and mapping barangay-level social vulnerability of Tacloban City and Ormoc City to climate-related hazards

  • Volume 1, Issue 1, December 2015

The destruction left by Typhoon Haiyanin the Philippines highlighted not only the exposure of the country but also the underlying vulnerability of barangays (villages) to climate-related hazards. This study utilized Geographic Information System (GIS) to characterize social vulnerability to climate-related hazards of barangays of Tacloban City and Ormoc City using a modified social vulnerability index (SoVI).


Perceptions of Typhoon Haiyan affected communities about the resilience and storm protection function of mangrove ecosystems in Leyte and Eastern Samar, Philippines

  • Volume 1, Issue 1, December 2015

The destruction caused by Typhoon Haiyan in the coastal areas of central Philippines drew greater international attention to the vulnerability of coastal communities to extreme weather and climate events. Mangrove ecosystems enhance coastal resilience by acting as barriers against storms and its impacts.


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