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Climate Change Impacts and Transformative Adaptation Strategies among Farming Households in the City of Koronadal, Philippines

  • Volume 4, Issue 1, April 2021

This study assessed the climate trends, changes, impacts, and adaptation strategies of farm households in five barangays in the Roxas mountain range, Koronadal City, South Cotabato by using household survey data from 265 respondents, and complimented with focus group discussions, and key informant interviews. The findings of the study revealed that climate changes are manifested by floods, landslides, and droughts as experienced by the local people which caused devastation and affected socioeconomic and environmental conditions of farming livelihood. Farmers used to have bountiful harvests, however, this situation recently changed due to the increasing climate-related risk events. The existing adaptation strategies are just stop-gap solutions that address the effects of climate change, but do not consider the root causes. To consider future changes in climate patterns, the socioeconomic and political structure and processes of the communities need to change by addressing multifaceted drivers of climate change hazards and their impacts. Some grassroot-level transformative adaptation strategies identified in the study consisted of socioeconomic facets, specifically, investment in children’s education, financial management, family planning, and development of alternative on-farm and nonfarm livelihood options. The environmental aspect, including the promotion of agroforestry system, water impoundment technologies, and advanced early warning system, were also considered.


Impacts of Carbon Dioxide Emissions on Global Intense Hydrometeorological Disasters

  • Volume 4, Issue 1, January 2020

This paper connects climate change and hydrometeorological calamities based on econometric evidence that links atmospheric CO2 accumulations to floods and storms. The study uses climate data from 155 countries, with a period spanning 46 years (1970–2016) and adopted a statistical and econometric approach to assess the factors that have contributed to the increase in the frequency of intense flood and storm events. Findings showed that the number of climate disasters could double in less than 21 years, and thus severely damage the environment, socioeconomic progress, and welfare of millions of people worldwide.


Harvesting and Managing Rainwater Using Collapsible Rubber Tanks

  • Volume 4, Issue 1, May 2019

Rainwater harvesting (RWH) is an existing technology proven to be effective in reducing pressure on water resource, yet often overlooked as a viable alternative for supplying water to households and businesses while reducing stormwater runoff in urban settings. This paper developed, fabricated and tested various collapsible rubber tank (CRT) designs and influence water users and decision-makers to strongly support RWH. With proper handling and maintenance, CRT can be a good alternative for rainwater storage and can be used in hard-to-reach areas particularly during emergency situations and relief operations.


Adaptive capacity of local communities to flash floods and landslides: Comparison of indigenous and non-indigenous people in Eastern Mindanao

  • Volume 3, Issue 1, December 2018

Only few studies investigated the adaptive capacity or adaptation practices of indigenous peoples (IPs) in the Philippines and none so far in the Compostela Valley. Since the landslide and flash flood events in 2012 brought by Typhoon Bopha, no systematic study has been conducted to compare the adaptive capacity of IPs and non-IPs in New Bataan’s most affected communities. This paper contributes to the assessments of adaptive behavior with the ultimate goal of stimulating adaptation support to the most vulnerable people.


Transportation Resilience in the Global South: A Post-Haiyan Investigation in Tacloban, Philippines

  • Volume 3, Issue 1, August 2018

In 2013, Super Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest tropical cyclones to impact the Philippines, made landfall in Tacloban City. The typhoon incapacitated the city, breaking down its main lifeline, the transport system. This article analyzes how a weakened transport system exacerbates disaster vulnerability, specifically manifested in the restricted mobility and access of people and communities immediately after an extreme event.


Assessment of Adaptation to the Impacts of Typhoon Pablo (Bopha) in Eastern Mindanao, Philippines

  • Volume 3, Issue 1, August 2018

Typhoon Pablo (Bopha) was the most powerful storm to have hit the island of Mindanao, southern Philippines in more than 100 years of recorded storms. This paper identified the adaptation gaps in the post-Typhoon Bopha recovery and reconstruction based on roundtable discussion, household survey and conjoint analysis.


Modeling of degraded reefs in Leyte Gulf, Philippines in the face of climate change and human-induced disturbances

  • Volume 3, Issue 1, August 2017

Philippine reefs are mega-diverse but, to date, few ecosystem models have been developed to understand their dynamics and functioning. This study assessed the status of reefs in 12 municipalities of Leyte Gulf, Philippines. 


Adaptation and adaptive capacity to flooding of farming households: Insights from Mabitac, Laguna, Philippines

  • Volume 2, Issue 2, July 2017

Vulnerability to flooding due to climate change results in limited access to resources, soil erosion and/or deposition, and reduced quality of water supply among others, affecting many farming communities. Recognizing the need to assess and better understand the adaptive capacity of farming communities, this study determined the effects of flooding and assessed the adaptive capacity levels of farming households in Mabitac, Laguna, Philippines as a case.


Tourism Industry Financing of Climate Change Adaptation: Exploring the Potential in Small Island Developing States

  • Volume 2, Issue 2, July 2017

In many small island developing states (SIDS), tourism is a principal driver of the economy and of infrastructure development. The SIDS’ tourism sector is, however, threatened by climate change impacts, which will likely incur high costs for climate change adaptation (CCA). 


The Role of Traditional Ecological Knowledge in the Disaster Risk Management Strategies of Island Communities in Cat Hai, Vietnam

  • Volume 2, Issue 2, July 2017

The very real threat of climate change requires effective disaster risk management (DRM), especially in highly vulnerable ecosystems such as island communities. Past disaster experiences in different parts of the world have revealed the importance of integrating traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) with scientific fndings in managing disaster risk.


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